Using Social Media to Recruit

It’s next to impossible to not be on social media today. Whether it’s your personal accounts or company accounts, you probably have some sort of interaction with social media sites on a daily basis. The use of mobile devices is on the rise and that rise is driving the importance of social media. Many companies are now using social media networks as tools for recruiting top talent.

While this sounds like a fantastic idea (and it may very well be) there are certainly right and wrong ways to go about using social media to recruit talent. Here are a few things you need to think about before launching into using social media for recruiting:

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Using Social Media to Find a Job

In today’s world, it seems almost impossible to not be on at least one social media network. You probably have some friends on Facebook. Maybe you have a couple of followers on Twitter. You may even have connections on LinkedIn, but did you know that you can use social media to find a job? You have unlimited resources at your fingertips every time you login to LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook. Using social media to find a job is all about knowing how to connect and put yourself out there.

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Finding and Keeping Top Talent

A lot of thoughts and theories exist out there when it comes to finding top talent for any industry. You have to choose from dozens of different online job boards. Then there are traditional postings like newspapers. And in today’s world, many companies are turning to social media to find talent. But at the end of the process, you need a specific type of talent. You need to find and keep top talent.

Wanting the best of the best is not enough to actually get you the best of the best. It takes time and effort to succeed at finding and keeping top talent. However, the efforts you make will be worth it in the end because you can reduce your costs and turnover rates by finding top talent in the first place.

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Questions Not to Ask in an Interview

In our last post, we talked about the importance of asking questions  in an interview and gave you some examples of questions you should be asking. Something else that is as equally important to know is what questions not to ask in an interview. When you ask the wrong questions during an interview, you can come off as aggressive and forceful, which can cause the interviewer dismissing you as a candidate.

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Checking References

When you start collecting all of those resumes, there is a lot of information to take in. You’ll look at education, work experience, skills, and accomplishments. One thing you’ll look at is references, though you’ll probably avoid it as long as possible.

Really, you don’t need to check references until after your initial applicant screenings, but keep in mind that reference checking is an important part of the process. Once you determine which applicants would make great candidates, you, you can start checking references. Applicants should have provided you with their references, but you may need to ask. Once you have the references, it’s time to start checking them. Here are a few tips on how to properly check references:

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Interview Questions to Ask

It’s no secret that interviews can be stressful. You have to think about what you are going to wear, what questions to prepare for, and how you are going to explain any gaps in your resume. But, there is one more key thing you need to be thinking about: the interview questions you’re going to ask.

Typically, interviewers will ask you if you have any questions, and having interview questions prepared is going to give a much better impression. So, before you leave home, make sure you’ve asked yourself, “what questions should I ask in the interview?”

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4 Resume Red Flags

As you start sifting through all of the resumes you’ve collected from job applicants, you might find that they tend to all look the same. Flipping from resume to resume, they start to blur together and you just don’t know which one is which. It can happen and that makes finding the right candidates even more difficult.

When resumes start to look the same, you can easily overlook small mistakes that candidates made or even miss something huge like incorrect information. While you probably don’t want to be skeptical of candidates, you need to treat resumes with a certain grain of salt. Fact checking is important when it comes to hiring new employees. But what do you look for? What could candidates be lying about? Here are four resume red flags to be looking out for:

  1. Listing a university, but not a degree.  You may see that the applicant studied at a prestigious school and think that it would be a great thing. However, you need to make sure that there is also a degree listed. If only a university or school is provided, it can be a resume red flag for not having completed the degree. When screening the candidate on the phone, be sure you ask why they left out the information.
  2. General employment dates.  Gaps in employment history can look really bad for an applicant, so in an effort to hide those gaps, a resume may contain years instead of specific dates for previous positions. Applicants are able to hide up to 12 months of unemployment by doing this. You need to know the circumstances around those gaps, so ask for a detailed work history with more specific dates.
  3. Exaggeration of job titles.  Trying to make themselves appear more important, applicants modify their job titles. While this looks impressive, it can cause work histories to not have a natural flow. If someone moves from an entry-level position to a director position, a resume red flag should be thrown. Don’t just look at titles. Read job descriptions to make sure those titles make sense and the responsibilities match.
  4. Overstating accomplishments.  It’s no secret that awards, certifications, and achievements look impressive, but sometimes there isn’t any real substance behind them. While some applicants certainly earned their awards, some may have simply paid for their awards. If you find that an applicant has a few different awards and you don’t recognize them, take a few minutes to do some research. You can easily find out the requirements of an award and it can be achieved.

These white lies may seem harmless to applicants, but they can end up hurting you and your organization in the long run. When you don’t know the truth about applicants, you can end up hiring someone who seems impressive, but doesn’t actually have the knowledge or the skills you are looking for. Take the time to look at resumes closely, ask questions when you see a résumé red flag, and spend time with anyone you are thinking about hiring before making your decision.

Call us today at 317.803.2910 so we can help you detect those resume red flags and make sure your candidates are qualified before you ever meet them. 

The Right Interview Questions

You probably have a huge stack of resumes and cover letters sitting on your desk. Or maybe they are sitting in your inbox. Either way, you are dreading reading them all. Even after carefully reading them and selecting a candidate, you could end up with an employee who turns out to not be what you thought.

While things like resumes and cover letters are certainly helpful in finding candidates, it’s important to focus on the interview. You can’t replace things like first impressions, responses to questions, and dealing with the stress of an interview with the information in resumes and cover letters. However, if you aren’t asking the right questions in the interview, you could still end up hiring someone you think is a great fit, but turns out to not be what you were looking for. Here are a few questions you should be asking in an interview:

1.  Can you tell me about a challenging work situation you experienced and what the situation resulted in?

By asking this question to candidates, you are going to learn how they handle stress and how they perceive results. You should be looking for honest answers, but also answers that have positive results. Candidates should be trying to show you that they work through issues and strive for positive results.

2. Why do you want to work here?

“It seems like a fun work environment.” “I really like the way the company is structured.” “Your brand is really great.” These are typical responses that don’t really carry any meaning. If a candidate gives you an answer like these, you’ll be able to tell they haven’t done much research. Look for specific answers about your company and show that thought and time was put into preparing for the interview.

3. What would you do differently, if you were to start your career over?

The ideal candidate would say nothing and are happy that their career path has lead them to you. But, we don’t live in an ideal world, so you should be looking for answers that focus on, growth, learning, and positive actions. You want a candidate who can recognize mistakes and is willing to make the necessary corrections to get back on track.

4. Where would you like to be in 5 years, career wise?

Sure, it may be a stereotypical question, but it’s an important one to ask. Interviewers sometimes avoid it because of overuse, but it serves a great purpose. You are looking for employees that are going to be dedicated to your organization and want to work for you. By asking this particular question, you can find out the goals of the candidate and if they match those of your company.

5. What type of work environment do you function best in?

As the one interviewing, you should have a handle on the work environment this candidate will be in. Is it fast? Hectic? Slow? Quiet? Once you are able to answer this question for yourself, you can ask candidates what type of work environment they work best in to ensure the two match. Employees who don’t fit with their work environments tend to be unhappy, stressed, and seek out other opportunities.

When it’s all said and done, you need to be asking interview questions that get to the heart of the situation: does this employee fit. Your questions should be tailored to your organization, the requirements of the position, and your overall goals.

Having trouble finding, interviewing, or qualifying candidates? We can help you!

The Rules of Shaking Hands

Shaking hands is simple, right? You just put your hand out, grab another one, squeeze, and then let go. But, what if you let go too soon? What if you hold on too long? What if you squeeze too hard? When you are preparing for your interview, there’s a good chance you aren’t practicing your hand shake. However, you should know a few common rules of shaking hands.

No matter how many times you have shaken hands, it’s important to know how to give a proper hand shake. After all, it is one of your first impressions, and those are crucial in the job seeking process.

Here are a few things to keep in mind when shaking hands during your interview:

  • Wipe your hands off. There is a good chance that you are going to be nervous before your interview and that may mean having sweaty palms. Wipe your hands off on your pants or in a restroom before your interview.
  • Initiate the shake. If the interviewer doesn’t automatically offer you their hand, you should offer yours. It shows that you take initiative and will result in a good first impression.
  • Smile. Smiling and saying something like, “it’s nice to meet you” can take your interview handshake even further. It’s important to act like you are confident and not nervous.
  • Make eye contact. You may be tempted to look at the handshake as it’s happening, but you need to establish eye contact with the person you are shaking hands with. Doing this helps reinforce that you are confident.
  • Be firm. In the past, it was common to treat handshakes between men and women differently. But, in the 21st century, it’s important to treat everyone equally, and that means the same handshake for all.
  • Avoid aggression. Gripping too hard, holding on too long, or shaking too long can make you seem overly aggressive. It’s ideal to only shake hands for two to three seconds. If you are nervous about holding on too long, take a cue from the interviewer. When you feel them let go, you need to let go.
  • End with a handshake. When your interview is over, you may be ready to claw your way out of the room. But, before you leave, you should shake hands again, refer to the interviewer by name, and thank them. By doing this, you add a personal touch.

That may be a lot to remember right before your big interview. Just keep in mind that you don’t want to be rude or too aggressive. If you forget everything you just read, then follow the interviewer and mirror their actions.

Diverse Staffing Named 2014 Best Places To Work In Indiana

February 19, 2014 – Diverse Staffing has been named one of the 2014 Best Places to Work in Indiana, based on results from a statewide program designed to identify, recognize and honor the best places of employment in Indiana. Diverse Staffing is the only staffing firm in its category to make the list that recognizes companies that excel in leadership and planning, culture and communications, job satisfaction, working environment, training and development, pay and benefits, and overall employee satisfaction.

This is the second time in three years that Diverse Staffing has earned a Best Places to Work in Indiana distinction for creating a productive environment in which employees feel valued.  The award program is a project of the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, BizVoice, Inside INdiana Business, the Society of Human Resource Management-IN State Council, the Indiana Economic Development Corporation and Best Companies Group.

“I’m very proud that Diverse Staffing has been named one of the Best Places To Work In Indiana for a second time. This is one of the highest honors a company can aspire to, and one that recognizes our employees’ passion for excellence, our teamwork and trust, and how we help and support one another,” said George Apgar, Managing Partner of Diverse Staffing.  “At Diverse Staffing, we recognize that our people are our greatest resource, and we have built a culture based on a foundation of excellence in everything we do for our staff, temporary workforce and our clients,” Apgar, continued. “This award is a testament to the daily commitment and dedication our people share to make Diverse Staffing an exciting and innovative workplace.”

Diverse Staffing offers a proprietary staffing delivery model that integrates online, mobile, social media, call center, and community-centric services. The Diverse approach is tailored to support all business types, from small offices to multi-state Fortune 100 manufacturing facilities – enabling clients to proactively plan, execute, measure, and continuously improve each staffing initiative.

Diverse Staffing will be honored at the 2014 Best Places to Work in Indiana Awards Dinner on May 1, hosted at the Indiana Convention Center in downtown Indianapolis and coordinated by the Indiana Chamber of Commerce. The final rankings will be announced at the event.